I'm Grace, a happily spoken for and particularly honest human being.
DCI - 7th Regiment Color Guard 2012, 2013, 2014 Captain


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Jul 25, 2014
@ 9:15 pm
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mtv:

congrats to the first-ever tumblr best fandom forever winner, harry potter! potterheads crushed it. 
see the winner in action on the mtvu fandom awards this sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv. hint: it might involve someone whose name rhymes with “songbottom.”

mtv:

congrats to the first-ever tumblr best fandom forever winner, harry potter! potterheads crushed it. 

see the winner in action on the mtvu fandom awards this sunday, july 27 at 8/7c on mtv. hint: it might involve someone whose name rhymes with “songbottom.”


Text

Jul 25, 2014
@ 6:51 pm
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16,527 notes

Anonymous said: Is there some kind of vegetarian alternative to feeder rodents for snakes? I own a corn snake and feed frozen mice but I'd like to have him on a cruelty free diet if possible. TY!

f1rstperson:

zerachin:

findchaos:

whowasntthere:

lunulata:

fuckyeahballpythons:

I’ve been glaring at this ask like once a day for the past two months.

And this person doesn’t stop to think that by feeding a snake a vegetarian diet that IS cruelty. To the snake.

Snakes, like cats, are fucking obligate carnivores. They literally need meat in order to survive. Educate yourself or don’t have a pet that you will only torture and eventually kill.

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if you’re not willing/able to deal with your pets diet then fucking dont get one

There is an effective way. It’s called “Give the snake to someone who isn’t morally opposed to caring for it and buy a rabbit.”


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Jul 25, 2014
@ 6:51 pm
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1,129 notes

coconutrumcake:

So polite

coconutrumcake:

So polite

(Source: reddit.com, via eilishfitz)


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Jul 25, 2014
@ 4:26 pm
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1,129 notes

coconutrumcake:

So polite

coconutrumcake:

So polite

(Source: reddit.com, via eilishfitz)


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Jul 23, 2014
@ 9:25 pm
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10,003 notes

thecatalier:

The diamond cutter


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Jul 23, 2014
@ 9:16 pm
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274 notes

(Source: nromanovaa, via ziggadabuzz)


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Jul 23, 2014
@ 9:16 pm
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6,412 notes

(via coloredmondays)


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Jul 18, 2014
@ 4:59 pm
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5,311 notes

kitmillsdraws:

Two myths. Probably the beginning of a series.

(via florescameron)


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Jul 18, 2014
@ 4:58 pm
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106,569 notes

magicalgirlwandamaximoff:

glitterarygetsit:

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.



FAVOURITE THING

I love how being a huge fan of something so frequently causes people to engage with learning. I hated maths, but after Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire came out, I worked out average page number increases and drew a projected graph of how long future books would be if trends continued. (I had Book 7 at nearly 2000 pages. My maths was right, but apparently JK Rowling does not use the calculations of teenage girls in her plot outlines.) Very little has spurred me on to learn, improve and do things I might normally not be interested in as much as being a fan has.


Well stick a bullet in my back and cal me Charles Xavier* whispers* wizard genetics, I’m like totally nerding out right now

magicalgirlwandamaximoff:

glitterarygetsit:

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

image

FAVOURITE THING

I love how being a huge fan of something so frequently causes people to engage with learning. I hated maths, but after Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire came out, I worked out average page number increases and drew a projected graph of how long future books would be if trends continued. (I had Book 7 at nearly 2000 pages. My maths was right, but apparently JK Rowling does not use the calculations of teenage girls in her plot outlines.) Very little has spurred me on to learn, improve and do things I might normally not be interested in as much as being a fan has.

Well stick a bullet in my back and cal me Charles Xavier
* whispers* wizard genetics, I’m like totally nerding out right now

(via magnetrx)


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Jul 18, 2014
@ 4:44 pm
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184,739 notes

(via stayfr-sh)